Articles

  • Israelology: A Biblical-Theological Perspective of the Past, Present and Future of Israel
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    Israelology is not currently an academic discipline within the framework of Biblical and Systematic theology. The doctrines of the Church (ecclesiology) and of the last things (eschatology) are for example part of theological thinking and research, but Israelology, the Biblical doctrine of Israel, receives little to no mention in theological textbooks. And yet, theological systems and churches differ based on their views of Israel.

  • A Review of ‘He Will Reign Forever: A Biblical Theology of the Kingdom of God’ by Michael J. Vlach
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    In his recently published book He Will Reign Forever: A Biblical Theology of the Kingdom of God, Michael J. Vlach presents a ‘comprehensive biblical theology of the kingdom of God from a new creationist perspective’ (2017:11). After introducing the kingdom programme (Part 1), Vlach traces the kingdom theme through the Old Testament (Part 2) and the New Testament (Part 3), before concluding with an examination of theological issues (Part 4).

  • Between the Mount of Transfiguration and Jerusalem and beyond: The chiastic structure of Matthew 17:14–20:34
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    In this article, a chiastic structure in Matthew 17:14–20:34 is identified, evaluated and discussed. This structure highlights the movements of Jesus between the Mount of Transfiguration and Jerusalem as he is on his way to the cross to provide forgiveness of sins.

  • Mark 4:1–34: A Simple Structure for the Mystery of the Kingdom
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    When discussing the mysteries of the kingdom, the parables of Matthew 13 receive all the attention, neatly outlined and structured, only to be appended by a unique Markan parable (4:26–29) that sticks out like a sore thumb. However, Mark 4:1–34 is not only structured, it also contains an integrated set of parables that collectively describes the mystery of the kingdom of God.

  • Reading Matthew 13 as a prophetic discourse: The four parables presented in public
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    Matthew 13 is still a battleground for interpreters. Even if commentators agree about what a parable is or what it may specifically mean, they may disagree about its eschatology. At least three major views exist about whether there are one or two phases to the kingdom of heaven. Even if they hold like-minded views about all the above, commentators may still differ about what the ‘mysteries of the kingdom of heaven’ are (cf. Mt 13:11). The words of Jesus Christ, however, will never pass away and the Lord requires every scribe instructed concerning the kingdom of heaven to understand ‘all these things’ and to bring forth what is ’new and old’ (13:51-52; 24:35; NKJV). Even if there is agreement that ‘all these things’ refer to the parables and mysteries of the kingdom described in Matthew 13, commentators disagree about what the ’new and old’ may refer to. Amidst the plethora of proposed interpretations, this series of three articles considers the parables of Matthew 13 as a collective presentation (‘all these things’) and parabolic juxtaposition of unconditional ’new and old’ prophecies regarding the kingdom of heaven.

  • Reading Matthew 13 as a prophetic discourse: The four parables presented in private
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    Matthew 13 is still a battleground for interpreters. Even if commentators agree about what a parable is or what it may specifically mean, they may disagree about its eschatology. At least three major views exist about whether there are one or two phases to the kingdom of heaven. Even if they hold like-minded views about all the above, commentators may still differ about what the ‘mysteries of the kingdom of heaven’ are (cf. Mt 13:11). The words of Jesus Christ, however, will never pass away and the Lord requires every scribe instructed concerning the kingdom of heaven to understand ‘all these things’ and to bring forth what is ’new and old’ (13:51-52; 24:35; NKJV). Even if there is agreement that ‘all these things’ refer to the parables and mysteries of the kingdom described in Matthew 13, commentators disagree about what the ’new and old’ may refer to. Amidst the plethora of proposed interpretations, this series of three articles considers the parables of Matthew 13 as a collective presentation (‘all these things’) and parabolic juxtaposition of unconditional ’new and old’ prophecies regarding the kingdom of heaven.

  • Matthew 13 and the feasts of the LORD
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    After summarising the results of reading Matthew 13 as a prophetic discourse containing ‘new and old’ prophecies that have been, or will still be, literally fulfilled, this article links the parables of Matthew 13 to the prophetic and typological fulfilment of the feasts of the LORD.

  • The kingdom of heaven and Matthew 10
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    This article discusses the kingdom of heaven before analysing the mission discourse of Matthew 10. Regarding the kingdom, a distinction is made between God’s universal or eternal kingdom (which includes all) and the mediatorial kingdom of God which focuses only on the earth. The mediatorial kingdom has gone through phases. One phase was the theocratic kingdom and another phase is the Messianic kingdom which will be established at Christ’s second coming.

  • ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the LORD!’ A chiastic structure for Matthew 21:1–23:39
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    The identity and authority of Jesus Christ is of fundamental importance. As Jesus’ public ministry is about to commence, God the Father attests to Jesus’ identity and the Spirit of God comes to rest on Jesus. The Gospel of Matthew, however, narrates the conflict over the Person and message of the King. As his public ministry is about to end, Jesus is involved in five controversies concerning his authority and identity. This article proposes a chiastic structure of Matthew 21:1-23:39, which focuses on the authority and identity of Jesus Christ, Lord and Son of David.

  • Behold the glory of the King: The chiastic structures of Matthew 21-25
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    The Olivet Discourse is complex and difficult to interpret, but crucial to any preaching about eschatology. By identifying two chiastic structures that mirror each other, namely in Matthew 21:1-23:39 and 24:1-25:46, the relation and correspondence of the parts to each other and to the whole may be identified. Whereas the centre of the chiastic structure of Matthew 21:1-23:39 emphasises the authority and identity of Jesus Christ, the Lord and Son of David, the centre of the chiastic structure of 24:1-25:46 focuses on the sign and coming of the Son of Man. Matthew 21:1-25:46 could be a major literary unit that emphasises the King’s entrance into, rejection of and exit from the temple and Jerusalem during his first coming, juxtaposed with the sign and coming of the Son of Man to Jerusalem in glory. Until then, the Lord expects his followers to watch, to be ready and prepared as they labour faithfully for him in these last days.

  • One Messiah, two advents, three forerunners: The chiastic structure of Matthew 11:2–17:13
    Written by Jacob Jan Scholtz

    This article proposes and evaluates a large chiastic structure for Matthew 11:2–17:13, leading to a discussion about the one Messiah, his two advents, and three forerunners, namely John the Baptist, the prophet Elijah, and another forerunner, the Apostle Peter, during the Inter-Advent Period. The structure emphasises God’s kingdom programme, the Inter-Advent Period and the parables of Matthew 13. The kingdom programme is highlighted. What may be theologically significant about this chiastic structure is that it may link Matthew 13 to the typological fulfilment of the feasts of the LORD by the Lord Jesus Christ and it also focuses attention on the roles of three forerunners.