1 & 2 Corinthians

1 & 2 Corinthians

During his second missionary journey, Paul moved from Athens to Corinth in about AD 51 (cf. Tenney 1985:291). During the next 18 months, Paul founded and established the local church in Corinth (Acts 18:1-11). Acting as a land bridge, the city of Corinth connected...

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Romans

Romans

After Paul’s third missionary journey, he wanted to go to Rome and then to Spain (Acts 19:21; 20:3-6; cf. Romans 15:24). According to the traditional view, Paul wrote the letter to Romans possibly in Corinth in AD 56-57 (Bailey & Constable 1999:249) or, according...

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The Gospel of John

The Gospel of John

The reason why the fourth Gospel about the Lord Jesus Christ was written is “that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing you may have life in His name” (20:31). This book is for believers and unbelievers, for babes in Christ and...

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The Gospel of Luke

The Gospel of Luke

Luke wrote the Gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts. Both books were addressed to “Theophilus”, a real person whose name in the Greek means “lover of God” (Luke 1:3-4; Acts 1:1-2). Because the longest book in the New Testament is systematically and “consecutively...

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The Gospel of Mark

The Gospel of Mark

The Gospel of Mark depicts Christ as the suffering yet powerful Servant of the Lord (Bailey & Constable 1999:67). Perhaps appropriate for a servant, Mark omits any genealogy. Christ fulfils the various Servant songs of Isaiah (42:1-9; 49:1-13; 50:4-11;...

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Keys of the Kingdom

Keys of the Kingdom

When he confesses that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God, Peter is blessed by given the keys of the kingdom (Matthew 16:16, 19). What did Peter really receive? What do these keys not mean? In a context where even John the Baptist wavered and others...

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John the Baptist and Elijah

John the Baptist and Elijah

The first law of logic is the law of identity, stating that something is what it is: an apple is an apple. The second law of logic is the law of non-contradiction, stating that A cannot be both A and not A at the same time and in the same sense: an apple is not a cat....

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Binding and Loosing

Binding and Loosing

The only two explicit references in the entire New Testament to the terms “bind and loose” appear in Matthew (but see also John 20:23). The first reference appears when Peter identifies Jesus as the Christ, the Son of the living God (Matthew 16:16). As the first among...

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The Sermon on the Mount

The Sermon on the Mount

The most famous sermon of all time is arguably Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount as recorded in Matthew 5:1-7:29. Jesus addressed this sermon to his disciples primarily, but he also preached it to non-disciples (Matthew 5:1-2; 13-16; 7:13, 28-29). Though it is a popular and...

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The Gospel of Matthew

The Gospel of Matthew

The Gospel of Matthew is probably one of the most read books in the world. The name ‘Matthew’ means ‘gift of God’ and ‘faithful’ — certainly this wonderful Gospel is a gift from a faithful God to us! What about Jesus Christ does Matthew focus on? Why and when was...

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An Overview of the New Testament

An Overview of the New Testament

If you were to provide the Gospel of Matthew or 2 Peter with a title, what would it be? If someone asked you to summarise Colossians, what would you write? Why and when were the books of the New Testament written? What is distinctive of 2 Corinthians or, asked another...

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1 & 2 Chronicles

1 & 2 Chronicles

Why was Chronicles written? After the Babylonian captivity, Jews had to be reminded where they come from, what God had unconditionally promised to Israel and what they could look forward to. Unsurprisingly, then, the first 9 chapters of 1 Chronicles provide various...

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